Its official, you have come to the conclusion that there aren’t enough hours in a day to handle all of the work your team is required to do. This is an enviable position although it might not feel that way right now.


So what do you do? You decide that it's time to start interviewing to find that new SolidWorks star that is going to help get your design team back on track.


But where do you start? How do you know who the right person is? More importantly, how do you know that they will have the core competencies to produce at a high volume and become an integral part of your team?


Simple - you test them.


Experts say a simple test isn’t enough. In fact they say the more difficult the test is, the better. This is meant to weed out the contenders from the pretenders. Only a comprehensive test of one’s CAD skills will separate the stars from the rest.


“I love seeing SOLIDWORKS certifications; however, I would still test. SOLIDWORKS has a great certification program, but it’s not foolproof.” - 5 Tips for the Perfect Solidworks Candidate


Your new team member should have the ability to handle difficult problems, so why give a rubber stamp test?


While this practice might seem a little one sided, the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. In fact, this article states that “Pre-employment tests limit the hours spent on time-consuming recruiting activities by making it easier to discover the right candidates with the most potential for success on the job”.


Implementing testing in your recruitment process allows new and existing team members to assert their CAD skills, and offers a benchmark for skill development moving forward. It also allows for a culture of peer to peer mentoring/training that will help to elevate your team as a whole.


Worried about the time it might take to implement? Remember that  in the end, the wrong hire will cost you much more than the time invested in developing and applying a test to your hiring process.


Good luck with finding your new SolidWorks stars! Happy testing.


Published on:

Monday, November 12, 2018